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Milwaukee Company Settles State Lawsuit Over Air Pollution Violations for $78,000

 

MILWAUKEE Altivity Packaging LLC, which owns and operates a flexographic printing facility in Milwaukee, has agreed to pay $78,000 to settle state claims under Wisconsin's air pollution laws.  The judgment resolves charges that Altivity failed to properly control air emissions at its Milwaukee facility from 2005 to April 2007.

 

Altivity manufactures flexible plastic packaging for consumer products at its Milwaukee facility.  The facility emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in several stages of its operations, including the use of clean-up solvents to wipe rollers on laminators and printing presses between production runs.  Altivity's permit requires that it control the emission of VOCs from the clean-up solvents by routing the emissions to an internal incinerator.

 

Under Wisconsin law, Altivity is required to obtain and follow a permit that controls the emissions of air pollutants from the facility.  The complaint charges that Altivity operated in violation of state air pollution statutes and its permit by venting to the atmosphere uncontrolled emissions of VOCs from the clean-up solvents from 2005 to April 2007.  As stated in the complaint, these violations resulted in the release of VOCs, which are a precursor of ozone and which can harm human health.

 

According to the complaint, Department of Natural Resources staff discovered the violation during an inspection of the facility in March 2007, and Altivity took steps to ensure that the VOC emissions from the clean-up solvents are routed to the incinerator promptly thereafter.

 

"Wisconsin law requires that industrial facilities comply with permits designed to protect the public from harmful air emissions," said Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen. "The DOJ will continue to work with the DNR to ensure that Wisconsin's citizens and natural resources are protected through compliance with the law."

 

Assistant Attorney General JoAnne F. Kloppenburg prosecuted the case.  Milwaukee County Circuit Court Judge Charles F. Kahn, Jr. approved the settlement.